Collection
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nevver:

Design Crush
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nevver:

It wasn’t meant to end like this
nevver:

It wasn’t meant to end like this
nevver:

It wasn’t meant to end like this
nevver:

It wasn’t meant to end like this
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lemanoosh:

http://www.artefactgroup.com/content/work/lytro/
lemanoosh:

http://www.artefactgroup.com/content/work/lytro/
lemanoosh:

http://www.artefactgroup.com/content/work/lytro/
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pureblyss:

pieffysessanta:

 Steve Hiett

So amazing.
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alldvy:
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cjwho:

A-Frame Residence, New York, USA by Bromley Caldari Architects | via
This striking looking A-Frame Residence is the result of an architecture conversion delivered by New York City-based studio Bromley Caldari Architects. The designers completely renovated the interiors of a 1960s beach home on Fire Island, turning it into a sleek hideout. With a spiral staircase splitting down the middle, four dark and cramped bedrooms, a leaky roof, and a cracked pile foundation, the original building required serious interventions.
By adding a new staircase, the layout was positively transformed and functionality took over he entire abode: “On the main level, a double-height living/dining room stretches the length of the window-clad north façade. The open kitchen and house utilities run along the south side. The master bedroom suite features full-height glass sliding doors that take advantage of the view. Although the doors stay mostly open, when guests are present and privacy is required, the sliding glass doors fog up at the flick of a switch.”
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

A-Frame Residence, New York, USA by Bromley Caldari Architects | via
This striking looking A-Frame Residence is the result of an architecture conversion delivered by New York City-based studio Bromley Caldari Architects. The designers completely renovated the interiors of a 1960s beach home on Fire Island, turning it into a sleek hideout. With a spiral staircase splitting down the middle, four dark and cramped bedrooms, a leaky roof, and a cracked pile foundation, the original building required serious interventions.
By adding a new staircase, the layout was positively transformed and functionality took over he entire abode: “On the main level, a double-height living/dining room stretches the length of the window-clad north façade. The open kitchen and house utilities run along the south side. The master bedroom suite features full-height glass sliding doors that take advantage of the view. Although the doors stay mostly open, when guests are present and privacy is required, the sliding glass doors fog up at the flick of a switch.”
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

A-Frame Residence, New York, USA by Bromley Caldari Architects | via
This striking looking A-Frame Residence is the result of an architecture conversion delivered by New York City-based studio Bromley Caldari Architects. The designers completely renovated the interiors of a 1960s beach home on Fire Island, turning it into a sleek hideout. With a spiral staircase splitting down the middle, four dark and cramped bedrooms, a leaky roof, and a cracked pile foundation, the original building required serious interventions.
By adding a new staircase, the layout was positively transformed and functionality took over he entire abode: “On the main level, a double-height living/dining room stretches the length of the window-clad north façade. The open kitchen and house utilities run along the south side. The master bedroom suite features full-height glass sliding doors that take advantage of the view. Although the doors stay mostly open, when guests are present and privacy is required, the sliding glass doors fog up at the flick of a switch.”
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

A-Frame Residence, New York, USA by Bromley Caldari Architects | via
This striking looking A-Frame Residence is the result of an architecture conversion delivered by New York City-based studio Bromley Caldari Architects. The designers completely renovated the interiors of a 1960s beach home on Fire Island, turning it into a sleek hideout. With a spiral staircase splitting down the middle, four dark and cramped bedrooms, a leaky roof, and a cracked pile foundation, the original building required serious interventions.
By adding a new staircase, the layout was positively transformed and functionality took over he entire abode: “On the main level, a double-height living/dining room stretches the length of the window-clad north façade. The open kitchen and house utilities run along the south side. The master bedroom suite features full-height glass sliding doors that take advantage of the view. Although the doors stay mostly open, when guests are present and privacy is required, the sliding glass doors fog up at the flick of a switch.”
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

A-Frame Residence, New York, USA by Bromley Caldari Architects | via
This striking looking A-Frame Residence is the result of an architecture conversion delivered by New York City-based studio Bromley Caldari Architects. The designers completely renovated the interiors of a 1960s beach home on Fire Island, turning it into a sleek hideout. With a spiral staircase splitting down the middle, four dark and cramped bedrooms, a leaky roof, and a cracked pile foundation, the original building required serious interventions.
By adding a new staircase, the layout was positively transformed and functionality took over he entire abode: “On the main level, a double-height living/dining room stretches the length of the window-clad north façade. The open kitchen and house utilities run along the south side. The master bedroom suite features full-height glass sliding doors that take advantage of the view. Although the doors stay mostly open, when guests are present and privacy is required, the sliding glass doors fog up at the flick of a switch.”
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

A-Frame Residence, New York, USA by Bromley Caldari Architects | via
This striking looking A-Frame Residence is the result of an architecture conversion delivered by New York City-based studio Bromley Caldari Architects. The designers completely renovated the interiors of a 1960s beach home on Fire Island, turning it into a sleek hideout. With a spiral staircase splitting down the middle, four dark and cramped bedrooms, a leaky roof, and a cracked pile foundation, the original building required serious interventions.
By adding a new staircase, the layout was positively transformed and functionality took over he entire abode: “On the main level, a double-height living/dining room stretches the length of the window-clad north façade. The open kitchen and house utilities run along the south side. The master bedroom suite features full-height glass sliding doors that take advantage of the view. Although the doors stay mostly open, when guests are present and privacy is required, the sliding glass doors fog up at the flick of a switch.”
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

A-Frame Residence, New York, USA by Bromley Caldari Architects | via
This striking looking A-Frame Residence is the result of an architecture conversion delivered by New York City-based studio Bromley Caldari Architects. The designers completely renovated the interiors of a 1960s beach home on Fire Island, turning it into a sleek hideout. With a spiral staircase splitting down the middle, four dark and cramped bedrooms, a leaky roof, and a cracked pile foundation, the original building required serious interventions.
By adding a new staircase, the layout was positively transformed and functionality took over he entire abode: “On the main level, a double-height living/dining room stretches the length of the window-clad north façade. The open kitchen and house utilities run along the south side. The master bedroom suite features full-height glass sliding doors that take advantage of the view. Although the doors stay mostly open, when guests are present and privacy is required, the sliding glass doors fog up at the flick of a switch.”
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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tafledger:

robert duvall, jesse eisenberg, colin firth, mark ruffalo, ryan gosling, and james franco. photographed by bill phelps (owner of moto cafe, williamsburg, brooklyn).
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wnderlst:

Geirangerfjord, Norway | Adam Machowiak
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cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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takeovertime:

(via Colibri Chair by Markus Johansson for HansK - Design Milk)
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cjwho:

The Jagdhaus Tamers by EM2 Architekten | via
Located in San Vigilio di Marebbe, Italy, the Jagdhaus Tamers is a cozy mountain cabin built entirely of wood. Designed by EM2 Architekten, the cabin has the special feature of a wall that can be opened up completely, exposing the home to the environment that surrounds it - and the stunning mountain viewscapes.. Built with minimal windows so that when it is empty it can be buttoned up and safe from curious wildlife, the home has a few long and linear windows and one large glazing that let the natural light in, but its not until the wall is opened up that the connection with the outdoors is complete.
The Jagdhaus Tamers is surrounded by a forest of tall, majestic trees that is home to a wide array of wildlife and when the homeowners spend time in their home away from home, they have a unique ability to enjoy the beautiful sounds of nature.
Photography: Mads Mogensen
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Jagdhaus Tamers by EM2 Architekten | via
Located in San Vigilio di Marebbe, Italy, the Jagdhaus Tamers is a cozy mountain cabin built entirely of wood. Designed by EM2 Architekten, the cabin has the special feature of a wall that can be opened up completely, exposing the home to the environment that surrounds it - and the stunning mountain viewscapes.. Built with minimal windows so that when it is empty it can be buttoned up and safe from curious wildlife, the home has a few long and linear windows and one large glazing that let the natural light in, but its not until the wall is opened up that the connection with the outdoors is complete.
The Jagdhaus Tamers is surrounded by a forest of tall, majestic trees that is home to a wide array of wildlife and when the homeowners spend time in their home away from home, they have a unique ability to enjoy the beautiful sounds of nature.
Photography: Mads Mogensen
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Jagdhaus Tamers by EM2 Architekten | via
Located in San Vigilio di Marebbe, Italy, the Jagdhaus Tamers is a cozy mountain cabin built entirely of wood. Designed by EM2 Architekten, the cabin has the special feature of a wall that can be opened up completely, exposing the home to the environment that surrounds it - and the stunning mountain viewscapes.. Built with minimal windows so that when it is empty it can be buttoned up and safe from curious wildlife, the home has a few long and linear windows and one large glazing that let the natural light in, but its not until the wall is opened up that the connection with the outdoors is complete.
The Jagdhaus Tamers is surrounded by a forest of tall, majestic trees that is home to a wide array of wildlife and when the homeowners spend time in their home away from home, they have a unique ability to enjoy the beautiful sounds of nature.
Photography: Mads Mogensen
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Jagdhaus Tamers by EM2 Architekten | via
Located in San Vigilio di Marebbe, Italy, the Jagdhaus Tamers is a cozy mountain cabin built entirely of wood. Designed by EM2 Architekten, the cabin has the special feature of a wall that can be opened up completely, exposing the home to the environment that surrounds it - and the stunning mountain viewscapes.. Built with minimal windows so that when it is empty it can be buttoned up and safe from curious wildlife, the home has a few long and linear windows and one large glazing that let the natural light in, but its not until the wall is opened up that the connection with the outdoors is complete.
The Jagdhaus Tamers is surrounded by a forest of tall, majestic trees that is home to a wide array of wildlife and when the homeowners spend time in their home away from home, they have a unique ability to enjoy the beautiful sounds of nature.
Photography: Mads Mogensen
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

The Jagdhaus Tamers by EM2 Architekten | via
Located in San Vigilio di Marebbe, Italy, the Jagdhaus Tamers is a cozy mountain cabin built entirely of wood. Designed by EM2 Architekten, the cabin has the special feature of a wall that can be opened up completely, exposing the home to the environment that surrounds it - and the stunning mountain viewscapes.. Built with minimal windows so that when it is empty it can be buttoned up and safe from curious wildlife, the home has a few long and linear windows and one large glazing that let the natural light in, but its not until the wall is opened up that the connection with the outdoors is complete.
The Jagdhaus Tamers is surrounded by a forest of tall, majestic trees that is home to a wide array of wildlife and when the homeowners spend time in their home away from home, they have a unique ability to enjoy the beautiful sounds of nature.
Photography: Mads Mogensen
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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